Thursday, September 15, 2011

Stinging Nettle - Side Effects and Health Benefits

Botanical Name: Urtica dioica, Urtica galeopsifolia.

Other Common Names of Stinging Nettle
Big string nettle, common nettle, isirgan, ortie, ortiga, gerrais, kazink, devil’s leaf, grote brandnetle, urtiga, brennessel and chichicaste.

Habitat:
While originally from the cold regions of northern Europe and Asia, this is now an herbaceous shrub that is easily found growing all over the world. This natural herb grows well in nitrogen rich soil and is most often found in disturbed areas such as lawns, gardens, and construction sites where the original plant species have been destroyed and made way for stinging nettle to take root. This plant is also found in open meadows and lightly wooded areas.

Description:
Usually reaching between two and four feet high, the stinging nettle has upright, rigid stems with heart shaped leaves that are toothed and tapered at the ends. The flowers are either yellow or pink and the entire plant is covered in small, stiff hairs. These are mostly found on the underside of the leaves and release chemicals when touched.

Plant Parts Used:
Leaf, stem, roots.

Stinging Nettle Therapeutic Benefits and Claims.

Used for hundreds of years as an herbal remedy, stinging nettle is best known for its ability to ease pain in the muscles and joints caused by arthritis and gout.

The herb stinging nettle

Used for hundreds of years as an herbal remedy, stinging nettle is best known for its ability to ease pain in the muscles and joints caused by arthritis and gout.
The herb stinging nettle
Stinging nettle
(Urtica dioica)
Stinging nettle is used as a diuretic and laxative. Various extracts of stinging nettle have shown to be effective in treating diarrhea and urinary disorders, as well as prostate diseases. Studies show benefits in benign prostatic hyperplasia when treated with stinging nettle.
Used directly on the hair, stinging nettle is thought to add shine, and prevent oily hair and dandruff. It is also believed to be effective in treating or preventing baldness, as well as getting rid of head lice.
Stinging nettle has shown promise in reducing sneezing and itching as results from hay fever. This use as an herbal remedy for hayfever is successful due to the nettles ability to reduce the body’s production of histamines in relation to the allergen.
Used as a medicinal herb to treat respiratory issues such as asthma, bronchitis, sinusitis and allergies. Stinging nettle is thought to be an effective histamine blocker as well as an inflammation reducer, and it has been used to treat allergic rhinitis without the side effects of popular allergy medications.
Taken internally, stinging nettle may be effective against ulcers, intestinal inflammation, and hemorrhoids.
Stinging nettle contains 3,4-divanillyltetrahydrofuran, which is used by bodybuilders to increase free testosterone.
Stinging nettle shows promise as a possible treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and ADHD.
In studies, stinging nettle has shown positive results against some types of cancer, including prostate cancer.
Because of its high vitamin K content, fresh stinging nettle can be used as a poultice to stop bleeding wounds and has also been used to stop excessive menstrual bleeding, nosebleeds, and other abnormal bleeding.
While fresh stinging nettle helps stop bleeding, dried stinging nettle has little vitamin K and is used as a blood thinner, making it useful herb against high blood pressure.

Source - http://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/

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